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and others. and in germany. >> family members are outraged. they were hurt that these support centers are closing in by a jenning but at some point, an airline has to say, we don't have any more information, right, we have to do this or is this timing particularly bad? >> well, the timing is particularly bad because there is still for the answers where their loved ones are. but in most air crash accidents, certainly all the ones i have worked on, the airline usually closes down its support system and they have a care team assigned member assigned to each family. they cut that off at about day 45 and that's pretty standard and the reason is, that is in most cases, the case is moving on to a different stage, here because they don't have a plane or their loved ones, it's particularly bad timing. it's not unusual to close it down about this point. >> oh, boy, thanks so much to both of you. appreciate it. >> already. the other woman in this clipper owners scandal is talking. what she told barra walters about her relationship with donald sterling and whether she thinks she a racist. first,
, germany, brazil. who have used columbine as an inspiration. and it's all that publicity that columbine got. the columbine killers they decided they wanted to feel important. and they sought revenge. revenge against their classmates who bullied them. maybe against all of society. and it seems to me that is the motive in this case, as well. >> i know -- i know it's revenge, i know a lot of it is notoriety. how could one not know about columbine even if you were a kid when that happened? i've heard a lot of folks say we, the media, we the public shouldn't be uttering the suspects' names because that then, of course, raises them to a level and elevates them to a level we shouldn't be doing. but do you think that would take away, you know, and some of these other potential school shooters' minds. the troubled minds, the intent to kill? >> first of all, the reporters have a duty to tell the public. and also, the idea of making them into big shot celebrities, putting them on the cover of celebrity magazines. but keep in mind that the copycat factor is inspired by all of this attention. during the
forward unilaterally with those sectoral sanctions but germany is the linchpin here. so president obama will be trying to do some arm twisting. as you say, another issue that might come up the nsa, the two leaders could discuss the fact that german chancellor merkel was quite upset by the revelations that her cell phone had been happened. but the issue of ukraine will overshadow all of the other issues. >> and jean cummings, you've covered economics in the business world for so many years and you've got bp and bsaf and deutsche bank and these other global companies, german and british companies really considering bp with heavy investments in russia. pressuring the leaders, cameron, merkel and hollande, the big three. >> there's a fair amount of tension there and germany is -- their biggest trading partner is russia. there are big stakes for germany in these negotiations however it is also important that the world show a united front. and merkel has talked about the need to come together in europe and to agree upon what -- how to proceed. and she is tougher than many of the others. and s
to him multiple timesk and germany is pivotal, because they are reluctant to go further with the further ek sectorial sanctions, because of the impact on the german economy. the trade between germany and russia was $1 billion and u.s. and germany was only $38 million. and germany gets roughly one-third of the oil and gas from russia, so a real concern within the german industry that they are the ones putting the pressure on angela merkel to be careful of what she does next because of the ricochet effect, and anything they do in russia could come back to haunt the german economy as well. >> a lot of money is at stake. and ambassador holliday, i want to get to you, and what do you think about the sanctions, and could they really get vladimir putin to change course here? >> well, it is going to be difficult to get him to change the course, but the increased sa sanctions could be twofold. one, we could get the europeans and germany in particular to escalate the sanctions on targeted energy companies, on that sector, but broadly speaking, we could go up to full sectorial sanctions which would
? >> stand by. jim, how much distance, daylight, is there between the u.s. and germany on the imp sigs of sanctions? >> clearly enough to keep the real sector sanctions. really the step that's going to make a difference and impose a real economic price on russia and we saw that difference in the last week when you had the obama administration seemingly teeing up harder sanctions than they were able to deliver when announced earlier this week. but two, the u.s. administration has made clear that they're holding those sanctions for the event that russian troops roll across the border into ukraine and they'll make the point we need that step, we need to impose some sort of price. the trouble is, that lays out the possibility for what's happening now, which is in effect, the stealth invasion. russian directed separatists taking over cities and towns causing disruption, shooting down helicopters. it's a real problem. >> the u.s. has made the point, administration officials make the point over and over again, the unity of the united states with the european union is what's all important here
into the civil, the world of civilized nations, and merkel is resonant to look at that economy. >> well, germany gets a third of the natural gas from rush sharks and 350,000 german workers depend on russian trade, and the difficu difficulty is that what are the chances that the europeans and the german s wis will make the ongoing sectorial sanctions? >> well, the dilemma is that the white house is going to make the going after putin and the cronies and the institutions with them to affect the course of the nation that i think that is, it is in the midst of a natural greatness campaign and wanting to feel a restoration of the pride and dignify in the world, and if you want to sanction the individuals, that is not going to necessarily give you the correction of the courses, and it is sort of like if you have the u.s. trying to sanction david koch and george soro soros, and hoping that the united states would go a different direction and many people have said that unless the sanctions are sectorial which involves pain for us, and pain for europe, russia will not take them seriously. and so it is th
on the border this morning, germany's chancellor angela merck la -- delivers as new message this morning. >> and the jobs number shows the economy may finally be bouncing back after a brutal winter. it's the most jobs added in two years. thein employment rate plunged to 6.3%, the lowest it's been since 2008. february and march job totals were revised up by a combined 36,000. the average now for the last three months, 238,000 jobs, about 60,000 more than the average for the three months before. big winners by sectors include business services, retail, food services, construction and health care. bottom line, this number was much bigger than anticipated but it's not all good news. part of the reason that the unemployment rate is down is of course that the total labor force dropped again, this time by more than 800,000 in april after increasing by half a million. that total jobs number added a big deal. if you think about it over the last five years, april, may, june, every time it looked like the economy was bouncing back, they would just sort of suck the life out of the economic recovery
point ceases to be in the interests of the german government. germany gets a third of its oil and gas from russia and some of germany's best-known companies, volkswagen for one, have huge stakes in russia. so any type of sanction has a potential economic blowback and it's just a sign of how the west has a limited toolbox in dealing with the situation in ukraine, chris. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for the reporting. >>> let's bring in cnn military analyst james "spider" marks a retired major generally and former commanding general of the u.s. army intillgence center. general, thank you for joining us. let's leave the politics aside and deal with the urgency on the ground. what do you believe the situation is? who is ukraine fighting? what do you think the stakes are? >> fighting two elements really. you do have pro-russian separatists that are in east ukraine, but they're being supported directly, not only in terms of what i would call over-the-horizon support, weapons support, but also they have russian forces are on the ground instigating this and these are the folks we've
that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya. general lovell was in germany awaiting orders to strike at the terrorists, orders that never came. >> what we did know quite early on is that this was a hostile action. this was no demonstration gone terribly awry. to the point of what happened, the facts led to the conclusion of a terrorist attack. the afri-con j 2 was focused on attribution. the attacks became attributable very soon after the event. >> so that means the u.s. military, the cia on the ground in libya, and pretty much everyone else directly involved with the benghazi attack knew it was not a spontaneous demonstration within hours. yet, as we proved yesterday, the obama administration created a fiction that the attack was a reaction to an anti-muslim videotape. the cover was blown off that deception this week when a memo by white house advisor ben rhodes was released through the freedom of information act. the memo clearly says that ambassador susan rice was prepped to tell the world on television that a videotape incited the murders in benghazi. incredibly,
, people lived in east germany constantly looking over their shoulder, wondering, which one of their neighbors was reporting on them. which am radplace had a microph? there were there hidden cameras? and people fought to get out of that. people lived under incredibly stress for that. and now we don't have that imposed on us by the government, although the nsa, notwithstanding, but we are rushing toward that voluntarily and delightfully, and maybe it's time we step back and say, do we really want to live in this technological panopticon? let's forget about donald sterling. put ourselves there. how many times a day do you have a private conversation that you really don't want to have recorded and then rebroadcast? and the technological element of this is what makes it really scary. we've always lived in a world where you could be talking to a trusted confidante, and they might repeat what you said. but that is markedly different from having yourself recorded or videotaped everywhere. and we are giving it away voluntarily. and maybe it's time that we realize we're at the bottom
for the scorpions but they replacedá m --4eÑ germany leg of the tour. >> unfortunate situation. thank you, trace. tonight of accountability at the veterans administration after reports that veterans died while waiting for care e#jz a va hospital in phoenix.8n in a new report tonight on]2q7ñ suggestions that the united states could find itself in second place a whole lotterilier than we expected. steward on that next. ♪ you've reached the age where you know how things work. this is the age of knowing what needs to be done. so why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long- term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the
Ñ germany leg of the tour. >> unfortunate situation. thank you, trace. tonight of accountability at the veterans administration after reports that veterans died while waiting for care e#jz a va in a new report tonight on]2q7ñ suggestions that the united states could find itself in second place a whole lotterilier than we expected. steward on that next. why is our arizona-based company relocating manufacturing to upstate new york? i tell people it's for the climate. the conditions in new york state are great for business. new york is ranked #2 in the nation for new private sector job creation. and now it's even better because they've introduced startup new york - dozens of tax-free zones where businesses pay no taxes for ten years. you'll get a warm welcome in the new new york. see if your business qualifies at if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain. this is humira helping me lay the groundwork. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors
.s. army air force crash landing in switzerland during bombing over germany are being awarded the prisoner of war metal. only eight are still alive. the men were initially held at a camp, but they tried to escape they were transferred to the prisoner of war camp in switzerland, which was run by the nazi. they were kept in unsanitary conditions, had little to eat, slept on straw and rated with numerous diseases. bill: molly, something changed to the policy in order for these medal to be awarded. it came with great effort to make sure the record was straightened out. reporter: absolutely, bill. they saw this as an injustice and did some research on the prison camp in u.s. law governing prisoners of war medals. a history professor at west point fought for the change. making a point they were as much of a prisoner of war camp in switzerland and not germany or japan. on behalf of his late grandfather who was a pilot. saying in a statement of the men held in switzerland, i thought it was important to overturn the dishonorable stigma on their service. all of my family is extremely proud of what m
manchester group and visitors from germany and japan. it may not look much, but manchester has been listening to people like tommy and making small changes to transport housing social care. taking accounts of all people in every policy decision they make. on a tour of the area, the international delegation sees shops with age friendly plans. >> definitely. it's a grass roots approach. it's based on reality of society. they try to make it the city everyone here can see. >> many changes here are small. manchester is leading the way in thinking, planning for the world of more and more older people. bbc news. >>> now south of the equator, stargazers are treated to the first solar eclipse of the year. this is known as annual eclipse seen in australia. the sun is almost obstetricured the moon. it's one of two for 2014. the second will be a partial in october which people in thehemi able to see. >>> a quick reminder of our top story. we brought you a twist in the tug of war with the issue in ukraine. russia describes the unprecedented increase in nato and u.s. presence at borders. russia says they h
" as being somehow related to her belief that hitler initially was good for germany. the owners of major league teams that year did appoint a four-member commission, so four other team owners, to investigate what marge schott had said and done. they decided after they looked into the matter that they would suspend her for a year for her racially and ethnically offensive language. that was in 1993, so she was gone for a year. she was back by 1994. didn't take long, though, because it turns out she wasn't kidding about the hitler thing and all the rest of it. >> even if you're not a baseball fan, you've probably heard of marge schott. the woman who owns the cincinnati reds and a set of opinions so outrageous she has other baseball owners wondering whether she can stay in the game. however, as nbc discovered, she also has her fans and the confidence of a woman who answers only to her pet dogs. >> she's legendary for pampering her dog schottzie more than her players and for shooting off her mouth. in "sports illustrated" she ridiculed asian americans and the japanese. >> when he came in, he
're starting in germany, the most visibly divided. it benefitted from trillions of investments in the west. some are critical of that reunification process. our special report throughout the rest of the day on that. >>> seems there's a hole in the dunkin brands business and i don't mean doughnuts. the baskin robins ice cream outlets reported lower than normal sales growth. the group isn't down and out. it's just announced the deal]çó here in the uk to expand ice cream collaboration within the movie group. do investorsut for that sort of tactic? we'll find out. we have the big dunkin boss in the studio. he is not allowed to enter the building without bringing product. we've got totÁhave props. >> i was going to make a request for my children. >> doughnuts? >> yeah. >> i'll see what we can do about that. >> my children and all their friends. >> you let your children eat doughnuts, shame on you. >> aaron, always a joy. thanks very much. >>> stay with us here on bbc. much more to come. >>> the latest on the malaysian flight that's missing. the australian prime minister says the search in th
deomark in germany. just widens the field of people who can participate. >> widens the field of people who can participate but also widens the search. one thing they're turning away from, tony abbott said it's highly unlikely that any debris is going to be found on the ocean surface. do you think it's smart at this point, david, to call off that search from the air? >> well, i think they have to pare it back, because it seems like they're grasping at straws. it seems difficult to do any serious modeling. >> shawn, any downside, you know, when you haven't really defined the haystack really that well for the underwater search, is there a concern in giving up the air search? >> well, no, i don't think. i think the air search, in my opinion, is coming to an end, just because of the time delay and the nature of the water that we have in the area. i think it's just extremely unlikely that anything really meaningful is probably going to be found at the surface. there might still be pieces out there somewhere. we might have to wait for those to float to shore and be found. i think as typically wha
's one in germany. there's only two really that would be available. >> thank you so much for your time. appreciate that. >> all right. >>> a teenager was stabbed to death in the stairwell of her high school on prom day. the stunned student body and police. they all want to know why. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> investigators in connecticut are trying to figure out the motive behind a deadly attack on a 16-year-old honors student. it happened yesterday at a school in milford. just about 20 miles away from newtown. police say a classmate slashed maren sanchez to death in a school stairwell. this is heartbreaking. what happened? >> she was a very popular girl. we're hearing a lot on social media from her friends and family. at about 7:00 a.m. this all unfolded in the stair
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)